How God Created, Part 2

Introduction

The previous article on the creation examined the linguistic nature of the creation. We finally need to dig deeper into the method of the creation according to the Bible, not by deception sight or deception. While the essential and initial nature of the creation was by the imperative amar and the debar, God used other methods to build on that foundation.

Gen. 1:4 God saw that the light was good; and God separated the light from the darkness.

How did God separate light from darkness? When there is a light source, there will be areas away from the source in darkness, thus being separated. In other words, God did specific actions like separating light from darkness by having light in one place and darkness out of reach from the light source. Even though the sun was not yet in existence (it was created on the fourth day), when the light source was on one side of the planet, the other side was in darkness. Some have speculated that since God is light, He might have had some light source orbiting the earth. We have no way of knowing, however. We may assume that is how light and darkness would be separated. Another example might be some object could come between the sight source resulting in a shadow or an area of darkness.

Let There Be

It is important to note that the Hebrew does not say “let there be” light, but just light. The translators added, “Let there be,” to make English. Nonetheless, even in English a person could command things by just saying the one word: stop without the “you”; fire without the soldiers. The adding of “let there be” changes the imperative “light!” to a more declarative sense.

Gen. 1:9 ¶ Then God said, “Let the waters below the heavens be gathered into one place, and let the dry land appear”; and it was so.

The translators add, “let.” The better way to translate this verse might be: waters below the heavens be gathered into one place and dry land appear. When the “Let” is left out, we see the imperative or the command given by God.

Gen. 1:14 ¶ Then God said, “Let there be lights in the expanse of the heavens to separate the day from the night, and let them be for signs and for seasons and for days and years;

Here again, translators add the “let there be.” A better rendition, closer to the Hebrew would be: Lights be existent in the expanse of the heavens to separate the day from the night, to be for signs and for seasons and for days and years;

Why is it important to get rid of the “let there be’s?” As we noted in the last article about the amar, God commanded by His authority as Creator things into existence by His debar. To say, “let there be,” is wimpy and weak, not strong and powerful, which characterizes God. The real God, the Supreme Being, the Almighty God did not say, “let there be,” translators did and made God appear less than Almighty. Little things can deceive people from the Truth.

Gen. 1:11 Then God said, “Let the earth sprout vegetation: plants yielding seed, and fruit trees on the earth bearing fruit after their kind with seed in them”; and it was so.

A more literal translation would be: Earth sprout vegetation, plants yield seeds and fruit trees (on the) earth bring forth fruit (after their) kind, or species, (by) seeds, thus(ly) or true(ly). God commanded the earth to sprout the flora. All the plants existed from the third day. Either the earth contained all the seeds intrinsically or God put the seeds into the earth on the third day. Nonetheless, God created the earth or dirt to contain and manage the growth and reproduction of each discrete species.

Gen. 2:5 Now no shrub, Strong’s shoot, of the field was yet in the earth, and no plant of the field had yet sprouted, for the LORD God had not sent rain upon the earth, and there was no man to cultivate the ground.
Gen. 2:6 But a mist used to rise from the earth and water the whole surface of the ground.

Notice that the plants had not yet sprouted, therefore, they must have existed as seeds up to the point of getting enough moisture in the form of rain to sprout. To keep the nascent plants alive until man could cultivate the plants, God created the water cycle, without, as yet, rain, as we still have to day including a mist or dew to water the earth.

Gen. 1:12 The earth brought forth vegetation, plants yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit with seed in them, after their kind; and God saw that it was good.

Even with the added words in the above verse, the translation stands in good shape. God saw or, by definition, to see, look at, inspect, perceive, consider. There is more to seeing than just a quick look. Furthermore, good, can be in a moral or descriptive sense as pleasant. Plants have no moral capability, not having free will, but are pleasant both in sight, smell and taste, with a few exceptions like, e.g., poison ivy, etc.

Gen. 1:13 There was evening and there was morning, a third day.

These next verses are better translated, except for the 15th verse.

Gen. 1:15 and let them be for lights in the expanse of the heavens
Gen. 1:16 God made the two great lights, the greater light to govern the day, and the lesser light to govern the night; He made the stars also.
Gen. 1:17 God placed them in the expanse of the heavens to give light on the earth,
Gen. 1:18 and to govern the day and the night, and to separate the light from the darkness; and God saw that it was good.

Gen. 1:20 ¶ Then God said, “Let the waters teem with swarms of living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth in the open expanse of the heavens.”

Let us make verse 20 more literal: then God said, “Waters teem with swarms of living creatures, and birds (you) fly above the earth in the open expanse of the heavens.

Note that God, in a more literal translation, commands the waters to teem with fish, crustaceans, mammals and, so forth.

Gen. 1:21 God created the great sea monsters and every living creature that moves, with which the waters swarmed after their kind, and every winged bird after its kind; and God saw that it was good.

Gen. 1:24 ¶ Then God said, “Let the earth bring forth living creatures (Hebrew: a soul, living being, life, self, person, desire, passion, appetite, emotion:) after their kind: cattle and creeping things and beasts of the earth after their kind”; and it was so.

Note that the Hebrew uses the imperative or command without the “let”: earth bring forth living creatures…

Whereas God told the waters teemed with aquatic life, here He commanded the earth (erets) to bring forth living creatures, breathing creatures. These animals were made of the earth (the soil, clay or dirt). The earth’s crust is composed of oxygen (47%), silicon (28%), aluminum, iron, calcium, sodium, potassium, magnesium and other elements (less than 2%). While water (H2O) is not a component of the crust, it permeates the soil, except of course desert areas that are very low in moisture. Whatever the crust, animals have the same elements but not in the equivalent amounts. Then, obviously, when an animal lives its life span, it dies and becomes part of the soil again. God formed the animal from the earth and they return to it when they stop breathing.

Gen. 2:19 Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the sky, and broughtthem to the man to see what he would call them; and whatever the man called a living creature, that was its name.

God formed (fashioned by shaping or squeezing like pottery) the air breathers, as I like to call them, without commanding them into existence.

Gen. 1:25 God made the beasts of the earth after their kind, and the cattle after their kind, and everything that creeps on the ground after its kind; and God saw that it was good.

The Bible reiterates that the animals would reproduce after their kind. I do not think God would approve of gene splitting to disrupt the desired course of events. For example, what does a Christian do if scientist put parts of pig’s DNA into a chicken, cow, or wheat? Would we even know?

Gen. 1:27 God created man in His own image, in the image of God He created him; male and female He created them.
Gen. 2:7 Then the LORD God formed man of dust from the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living being.

Like animals, God formed man out of the clay or soil. The difference is that God breathed into man the breath of life. The Hebrew for breath is naphach, which is linguistically related to naphesh, creature. This breath, as we know, gives mankind the ability to think, reason­ — beyond the capabilities of animals or air breathers. Obviously God created a hierarchy of life on earth, man being at the top of the list followed by air breathers, then creatures of the seas and finally plants. God apparently did not mention Insects and microbes, for whatever reason.

God Called

In various places in Genesis God tells us the names of particular things. The name of light He called day and the dark night. We need to know what light and dark are, but light and darkness have further meanings, which God gives to us as time or the Bible goes on. For example, God is light, which is, obviously, more than daylight, more than illumination, more than enlightenment and all combined depending on the context.

Gen. 1:5 God called the light day, and the darkness He called night. And there was evening and there was morning, one day.

Gen. 1:8 God called the expanse heaven. And there was evening and there was morning, a second day.

The expanse, of course, is the raqia, which is a kind of transparent screen to hold the heavenly bodies. God probably used several screens to hold the various elements of the heavens from satellites to the planets and the sun and the stars beyond.

Gen. 1:10 God called the dry land earth, and the gathering of the waters He called seas; and God saw that it was good.

God further named or called such things as the dry land as earth and the waters seas. He differentiated between the sea beds, and others, and the land beyond the edge of the seas because each served a different purpose; for example, one does not grow wheat on the Atlantic shelf. Actually, beyond algae, it is difficult to imagine what sea vegetation we do eat. The gathered waters God called seas because they are different from the fresh water in rivers, except for tidal rivers, and lakes.

The impact of God’s giving His creation names is to identify them and also to give them the comprehensive meaning their names have through the various levels of root sounds, which we have studied.

God Saw:

Overall, God saw that the creation was good. After He finished each phase of His work, He stepped back, as it were, and noted that it was good, that is, tob — pleasing, pleasant, agreeable, abundant (generous), fitting, precious, intelligent, what is best, complete and (morally) good. Each of these terms tells us what we also see from the creation.

Gen. 1:4 God saw that the light was good; and God separated the light from the darkness.

Gen. 1:10 God called the dry land earth, and the gathering of the waters He called seas; and God saw that it was good.

From the dry land we get precious and abundant food.

Gen. 1:12 The earth brought forth vegetation, plants yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit with seed in them, after their kind; and God saw that it was good.

Gen. 1:18 and to govern the day and the night, and to separate the light from the darkness; and God saw that it was good.

Gen. 1:21 God created the great sea monsters and every living creature that moves, with which the waters swarmed after their kind, and every winged bird after its kind; and God saw that it was good.

Gen. 1:25 God made the beasts of the earth after their kind, and the cattle after their kind, and everything that creeps on the ground after its kind; and God saw that it was good.

Gen. 1:31 God saw all that He had made, and behold, it was very good. And there was evening and there was morning, the sixth day.

Gen. 1:2 The earth was formless and void, and darkness was over the surface of the deep, and the Spirit of God was moving over the surface of the waters.

God Blessed:

Gen. 1:22 God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.”

Gen. 1:28 God blessed them; and God said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth, and subdue it; and rule over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the sky and over every living thing that moves on the earth.”

God, the life giver, blesses His living creations by, in part, making them fruitful and fill the earth. God additionally blessed mankind by giving them the authority to subdue the earth, that is, bring it under his (mankind’s) control and to rule over all living creatures. He blessed man in a way differently from what we might think a blessing is. The blessing here is working hard to force the earth to man’s will by cultivation, say, and working hard to rule over all living creatures.

Seven Days, Evening and Morning

Unlike all other concepts of how and how long it took to create the heavens and the Earth, God took six days, evening and morning, just like today’s twenty-four hour period. In fact, Gods adds to the evening and morning statement by saying, “one day.” He repeats, the evening and morning, one day, six times, which leaves no doubt in our minds as to the time involved. Only people who would rather walk by sight (or science) will not believe what God says about the creation.

Gen. 1:5  (Light creation) God called the light day, and the darkness He called night. And there was evening and there was morning, one day.

Gen. 1:8 (Expanse and separation of waters creation) God called the expanse heaven. And there was evening and there was morning, a second day.

Gen. 1:13  (Vegetation creation) There was evening and there was morning, a third day.

Gen. 1:19  (Sun, moon, stars creation) There was evening and there was morning, a fourth day.

Gen. 1:23 (Sea creatures and birds creation) There was evening and there was morning, a fifth day.

Gen. 1:31 (Animals and man creation) God saw all that He had made, and behold, it was very good. And there was evening and there was morning, the sixth day.

Conclusion

Psa. 104:14 He causes the grass to grow for the cattle,
            And vegetation for the labor of man,
            So that he may bring forth food from the earth,
Psa. 104:15 And wine which makes man’s heart glad,
            So that he may make his face glisten with oil,
            And food which sustains man’s heart.
Psa. 104:16 The trees of the LORD drink their fill,
            The cedars of Lebanon which He planted,
Psa. 104:17 Where the birds build their nests,
            And the stork, whose home is the fir trees.
Psa. 104:18 The high mountains are for the wild goats;
            The cliffs are a refuge for the shephanim.
Psa. 104:19 He made the moon for the seasons;
            The sun knows the place of its setting.
Psa. 104:20 You appoint darkness and it becomes night,
            In which all the beasts of the forest prowl about.
Psa. 104:21 The young lions roar after their prey
            And seek their food from God.
Psa. 104:22 When the sun rises they withdraw
            And lie down in their dens.
Psa. 104:23 Man goes forth to his work
            And to his labor until evening.
Psa. 104:24 O LORD, how many are Your works!
            In wisdom You have made them all;
            The earth is full of Your possessions.

Amen.

Gil Kovacs,
Pastor, Sabbath Christian Church